Tag: DNS zone

DNS record types – Definitions & PurposesDNS record types – Definitions & Purposes

The whole complicated Domain Name System has different DNS record types. Without them, this system will not be able to function. Why they are so important and what are their primary purposes we are going to see today in this article. 

DNS record – definition

Before exploring different DNS record types, we will see what the term DNS record means. They are text instructions situated in the zone file. Their primary purpose is to allow domain names to be resolved to IP addresses. They are so light and easy for modifications if they are necessary. We use different record types because computers are not like us humans and can’t understand the texts. So that’s why we translate this information in their language via DNS records. In other words, they translate the written information into numbers that machines can understand.

What are the most popular DNS record types?

Referring to the above, there are lots of DNS record types. Each one performs a specific job that is crucial for the proper operation of your Domain Name System. We’ll look at five of the most important ones, which are: 

A record

The A record is perhaps the most common and popular DNS record type. Its major goal is to link a domain name to the IP address that corresponds to it (IPv4 address). A user requests the A record whenever they wish to access and explore a specific website (domain name). It must be pointed to the correct IP address.

The A record is an essential aspect of the DNS setup. The domain name would be unable to be resolved if it was not found in the DNS zone.

SOA record

The next vital DNS record is SOA, representing the start of authority. It’s where the zone’s administrative data is kept. It is the initial DNS record in a DNS zone file, and it also establishes the zone’s general attributes. It also contains information on zone transfers, such as the refresh rate, retry rate, and administrator’s email address.

The SOA record acts as a control record with a serial number that indicates whether a new update is available. When the Secondary DNS servers notice a change in the number, they will update and obtain the most recent information.

PTR record

Another essential DNS record is the PTR record. If you want to send emails to anyone without difficulty, you’ll need it. The PTR record, also known as a pointer record, serves the opposite purpose as the A record. It connects a domain name to an IP address. When you send an email, your recipient will want to double-check that it was sent from your domain name. As a result, here the PTR record comes. If you make a mistake configuring the A record and the PTR record, your emails will most likely end up in your recipients’ spam folders.

MX record

The MX record, which stands for Mail Exchanger record, is another crucial DNS record type. It aims to direct the email server in charge of receiving emails for a particular domain name. It contains the domain name that points to the incoming mail server’s hostname. In addition, it should be noted that it must point to a hostname rather than an IP address.

In case of failure, you can build up a backup by creating numerous MX records with different priorities. It is critical for you to be able to receive emails correctly.

TXT record

We can’t skip the TXT (Abridged from text) DNS record. It is very versatile. In a text format, it provides information to sources outside of the domain. A type of TXT record is the SPF record. Mail servers are using it to decide if the mail source is trustworthy and comes from the correct domain. 

The TXT records could be used for different verification and authentication methods. Increasing the level of trust in your domain and emails is vital for your internet reputation.

Conclusion

Now, you can safely say that you are familiar with the fundamental DNS record types. They are critical for your Domain Name System to run smoothly and without a hitch. If you configure them well, you will have no problems.